A Heart of Worship

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We are excited this weekend to have a new speaker at one of events.  Sheila Thomas is going to be sharing with our local leaders about the importance of having worship as part of our Women’s Ministry events.

Do you put much thought, as a Women’s Ministry Leader about incorporating worship into your events?  Whether you are choosing a formal worship event, that is all about singing songs of praise and thanksgiving, or having a few minutes dedicated to opening an event in worship… here are a few quick thoughts to consider.

Events tend to be a place where we feel very comfortable inviting guests.  These guests may not be familiar with old hymnals, your church’s go-to song list, or even what is being played on local Christian stations.  Therefore:

  • Look for songs that are easy and do not have complex melodies that are hard to follow.
  • Select songs that use more common vocab words vs. “Christianese”, so that our guests understand what it is they are singing.
  • Print out the lyrics or have the lyrics displayed on a projection screen for those who are unfamiliar, never assume people have memorized the lyrics to a common song or can follow along.
  • Even though women do tend to naturally sing at a higher octave than men, consider the untrained voice may have difficulty with high notes and use them sparingly.
  • Consider the theme of your event, the emotion you want to evoke from the women, and select songs that fit the theme or desired response well.
  • Don’t be afraid to bring in a male worship leader for a women’s event.
  • If your church worship team is taxed for time already, consider using someone from the body who has this gift but can’t commit to the regular schedule of the worship team.  There may also be someone from your youth group that could lead worship.
  • Contact local Christian Colleges with music programs for potential worship leaders.   Many of these colleges require volunteer hours of their students, and leading worship may count.  This is a win for the student, to gain more hours.  It’s a win for the ministry too, as it helps offset budget concerns.  Make sure to ask the college if you are allowed to compensate the student for travel time/expenses or give a monetary thank you gift even though they are volunteering.
  • Consider balance in the planning stages regarding how much time you want to allot for worship songs, where in the course of the program do you want to utilize them (beginning, throughout, ending).

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Many thanks to Ligonier Ministries and their magazine “Table Talk“, for gifting the women in attendance this weekend a copy of their back issue Worship Matters“.  It is a great addition to our speakers thoughts on why we need to incorporate worship in to our programs.  It’s a valuable resource on a beautiful topic.

Pray Top Down

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A standard protocol for any ministry is to pray for God’s protection and favor over their work.  At a Women’s Ministry team meeting, we may pray for each others’ personal requests, for the event we are planning, and the women in the church. How often do you make sure to include praying for your Pastor, Staff, Church, and the Community it is serving?

So often we are focused on our own ministry needs that we forget that we are part of a bigger ministry in our community.  We are focused on our own ministry, and our own church… and we may forget about the other ministries and churches that are serving in our areas as well.  We also may be so focused on our role in serving in our ministry area that we forget that we are part of a body larger that we serve as well.

As we delve into the topic of Prayer & Worship in your Women’s Ministry at this weekends training event, we want to make sure that we don’t neglect to remind our leaders the importance of praying beyond your ministry.  We are grateful for The Good Book Company’s book “5 Things to Pray for Your Church”, which walks you through the ways you can be praying for your church, your role within it, and beyond your church walls.  The women attending our training event will be receiving a copy of this book courtesy of The Good Book Company.

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A posture of prayer needs to start from the top down.  As ministry workers who are part of a larger church body, before we begin praying for our own ministry needs and direction, we must begin with the church from the top down.  We pray for protection over the building, and we pray that our Pastors will be protected & have wisdom in shepherding the flock. We can even go a step further up, as we pray for our country and elected officials and how they will respond, represent, and protect the rights of the church.

As we lead the women in our church to a posture of prayer, and model the behavior and practice before them, we can also help them to foster a position of prayer over the church they call home.

Model the Prayer

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For some people prayer seems to come naturally, it pours off their lips like sweet nectar.  We can even be envious of another person’s ability to pray, as their heartfelt words sound like music to the soul.  For others, prayer is like walking through a room full of mouse traps with a raw egg on a spoon… hoping you can make it to the other side with out falling.  We can recognize the preciousness of what we are carrying (sweet words to the Lord), we understand the importance of our task (to honor and praise Him, to confess and surrender to Him), and yet the words just do not flow at all.

There are those whom the Lord has anointed the spiritual gift of intercessory prayer.  While we are not to covet or try and take a gift that was not intended of us, prayer is not an exclusive gift that only some of us get.   The scriptures give us multiple examples of people who cried out to the Lord, written prayers of the saints, and even Jesus himself was asked:  Lord, how do we pray?  He answered with The Lord’s Prayer.  Prayer is something that we are all called to participate in, and yet a common area new believers (and even some seasoned believers) stumble through.

Here is the GOOD NEWS… a prayer can be as simple as crying out the Lord… Oh, God!  For the Lord knows what is on our hearts and what burdens us.  He knows the trouble we face, He understands the words that we fail to utter in our despair.  The Lord is also patient, and He will listen as you unload every word running through your head… whether it is in eloquent sentences or broken up by sobs.  He mourns when we mourn, because He loves us so deeply.  He rejoices when we pray to Him in thankfulness and praise.  He hears the hushed tone Thank you, Lord as much as the loud Thank You JESUS for your blessings of which I do not deserve!

Yet, there is MORE good news.   When we want to understand more about how to pray, the scriptures are there to answer that need.  We will learn what TO DO and what NOT to do in our prayer life.  We have the example of The Lord’s Pray, and the prayers of others who have come before us.   In addition, we have books that can help us improve our prayer life.  Whether it is a book of sample prayers, books that have pulled out the prayers directly from the scriptures, and books that walk you through the process of praying from your own heart.

As Women’s Ministry Leaders we can help foster an attitude of prayer in our church by modeling prayer in our personal lives.  We can also help foster a posture of prayer in the lives of the women in our church by helping them develop prayer habits.  Prayer teams do not need to be made up of only those who excel in prayer.  They can be a great place to put women who desire to deepen their prayer life.  Prayer rooms can provide direction and resources, as well as women who are available to help model prayer to those who walk in those doors.

Another option is to begin an intentional step toward developing good prayer habits by adding Prayer to your Small Groups menu.  This weekend the women in attendance at our training event will be receiving a copy of Susan Hunt’s Prayers of the Bible study book and leader guide.  Not only is this a great opportunity to talk with your existing small group leaders, about having a small group focused on prayer… but it is a great introduction to get NEW small group leaders in place.  If you have a woman who is already a prayer warrior, but didn’t think she could be a small group leader… WHAT A GREAT WAY TO GET HER STARTED!  This would allow her to get her feet wet in the leader process while leading a subject that is already near and dear to her heart.

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Thank You P&R Publishing for your support in our upcoming Women’s Ministry Council training event on Prayer and Worship & their role in our Women’s Ministry programs!

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Small Group Series – Q & A

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By Gena McCown, Co-Founder Women’s Ministry Council

We’ve come to the end of our series, however this series couldn’t possibly answer or address every question or need on the subject.  We are going to close this series by answering questions that were submitted earlier in the series, and hopefully in doing so … we’ll fill the gaps.

Q:  What is the difference between a Small Group, Life Group, Adult Sunday School, and Bible Study?  Do we need them all, and if so why?

A:   To a certain extent, it really is semantics.  In many churches these terms are interchangeable,   Small Groups and Life Groups are especially.  Generally speaking, Small Groups and Life Groups are intentional groups of church members (usually under 12 people) that are “going through life” together.  They may study the bible, a helpful book, or even weekly topical studies together.  The purpose of the group is spiritual growth, relationship building, and accountability.  Bible Studies and Adult Sunday School, are more akin to traditional models of group study.  They are generally larger, and stick to scriptural study.  This may be in the way of expository (line by line exploration of the scriptures) or using printed Bible Study curriculum.    Over the years, the lines have smudged a bit and Bible Study Groups may elect to study a helpful book, or a small group may grow into a “large group”.   I believe they all share the same goal for spiritual growth, although small groups and life groups create more relationships building opportunities.

Q:  How do I get people to sign up for my Small Group?

A:  There are a few ways to get interest built in your small group.  First, I think we need to do a better job of talking up our small groups before the official sign up period.  This also includes making sure that we are clear about the details, date… time… place… number of weeks… childcare… cost… etc.  Bring it up among your friends, post it on your facebook page, etc.  In the churches we should also make a purpose to highlight small groups leading up to the signs ups with intro videos playing between services, information in the church lobby, etc.   

Second, personal invitation is a great way to bring people into the fold, it tells the women you encounter that you want to get to know them better or would like to share this experience of growing in faith with them.  One thing that can happen (it’s happen to me personally) is that as life groups grow and leaders are developed your personal circle of friends may become life group leaders.  You can actually run out of women to invite, because you don’t know them.  This means you need to get intentional about meeting new women in the church.  

Third, we have to remember the saying “out of sight, out of mind”.  Many people have the intention of signing up for small groups & will forget.  It is important that when we are announcing small groups at church or a women’s event that we have a way for them to sign up immediately.  A kiosk in the lobby that directs to a digital sign up or an old fashioned table with clipboards set up in the lobby, either are great ways to get the women to sign up before they get home and life gets in the way.  Another option is a Small Groups Kick-off Brunch.

Q:  How do we fund our small groups?

A:  If small groups are part of the church vision, then when it comes to the purchasing of leader materials (video, leader guide, etc) this is an investment the church or Women’s Ministry makes.  Then, each participant can purchase their own workbook.  Many publishers off bulk discounts on materials that could save the participants money, but this requires collecting the $ in advance or the church purchasing materials that may go unused if the sign up is less than expected.  I suggest picking a publisher that has a good array of materials, so that you can build an account and relationship with that publisher. 

Present your small group menu well in advance for your church members to sign up, and take payment when they sign up.  This allows you to only order the materials you need.  People who have paid at the time they sign up are more likely to stick through the commitment as well.  Then, when the Small Group meets for the first time, you can distribute their books.    This also helps your leaders know exactly how many people to plan for.   When we allow people to sign up, and then purchase their own workbook… we have no clue on who is actually going to follow through & show up.   When we require our Small Group leaders to fund the group themselves, we lessen the number of leaders who are going to volunteer to lead. 

If you are a small church, church plant, or a ministry independent of a church… funding the study may not be in the budget.  Then, as a Small Group leader consider dispersing the cost of the materials among everyone in the group.  $100 leader kid, $10 workbook… 10 women in the group, everyone pays $20.  Or if the church can budget $50 towards the leader kit, each woman pays just $15.    Also consider, if you are on a tight budget, video series where you don’t need the workbooks (or vice versa).  Share materials with other Small Group Leaders, or find a larger church you can establish a relationship with and borrow materials.  Or, teach an expository or weekly topical study that doesn’t require anything more than your bible.

Q:  How can I lead good discussions in our group vs. asking “what does this scripture say”? 

A:  I think discussion questions are a huge trip up for some small group leaders, which is why they like to purchase curriculum versus writing/teaching their own.  In this case, the leader guide generally has discussion question prompts in place and you are following a script.  I believe this is a great option for new leaders, because they can get their feet wet in the process of small group leading.  For seasoned leaders, what I suggest is to begin with the purpose you chose this particular study.  What is the goal, what do you hope the women achieve by completing this study independently and as a group.  Once you identify your goal for the study, you can then create questions that are going to move the women toward that goal.  Creating questions that gently guide them to the “ah-ha” moment.  In fact, this is why I strongly suggest having your goal in place before you even pick the study.  If you are picking a study because it’s popular, or “looks good”, there isn’t a goal in place.  Without a goal, you will struggle to come up with engaging questions.  With a goal first, you will find your questions are in place, and you select a study that helps answer those questions.

If you questions are not your thing, you can always ask someone else in your group to lead that portion.  I must admit, some people are just better at it than others.  You could even assign that task to multiple women in the study, each week a different person is tasked with writing the discussion questions.  Also, when you preview the material ahead of the group vs. watching it for the first time with them… take notes.  The points you thought were worth writing down can become the launching point of the questions you ask.

Q:  When should a Small Group be “OPEN”, “CLOSED”, or “DROP IN” in regards to attendance/members.

A:   There are only two Small Groups in which I think “DROP IN” is appropriate.  1st, is the very first week.  If someone isn’t certain if this particular study is something they want to commit to, allow them to drop in for the first session and view the introduction with the group.  2nd, is if your Small Group is a topical study that changes from week to week.  This allows the women to drop in only on the topics that interest them.  I love this option for seasoned believers or busy women who are trying to plug in but their schedule doesn’t allow for a long term commitment. 

Open Groups are great for big topics.  For example if you church offers Dave Ramsey Financial Peace as a Small Group, this is a perfect for Open Groups.  Expository or Book By Book Study Groups are also appropriate for Open Groups, as they are working through the scriptures.  Open Groups are great for new leaders who are leading their first small group, or leaders who are more interested in getting to know other women in the church.  Open Groups are important to have so that the women who attend your church have an opportunity to find their fit within a group of women vs. being thrust into a group where they can’t connect.

Equally, Closed Groups are also important to have in the church because these are the groups where deeper fellowship and accountability occur.  Most Closed Groups start that way, a group of women who decided to meet together as a Small Group.  However they are not advertising their group to the church, but letting you as the WM Leader know that they are part of a group.  Other Closed Groups start off as Drop In or Open Groups, that over time relationships began to form and they make the conscious decision to continue close the group to new members.  Closed Groups are important because the relationships that develop are deeper, there is accountability in this group, personal information begins to be shared, etc.  At this point it is important to protect that group by closing the group.  Then it is up to the leader and group to determine if, when, and who is added to the group. 

It is my belief that all three of these types of groups should be happening in your church.  Open Groups and Drop In Groups are the first stop usually for new members in the church, guests, etc.  This is where they can test the waters, get introduced to how small groups work, and find their fit.  Closed Groups are the ones where real relationships are developed, and I believe the long term goal for each woman in your church should be to move from an Open/Drop In Group to a Closed Group.  Our Small Group menus should be very intentional.

Q:  How Do I Refresh Interest After A Year?

A:  When interest starts to wane, the first question we need to really understand is WHY that happened.  Was the study too intense?  Too long?  Did we notice interest started to drop about half way through?  Or, did women disengage almost at the beginning?  Then we can move onto examining other possibilities.

If a study is too long, or too intense, it could just mean that the women need a break.  Either a literal break, taking a few weeks or months off.  Or, a break in the material itself and as a leader I need to find something a little bit lighter for our next round.   If we notice that somewhere between the beginning and middle, women were already disengaging… that is generally a good indicator that the study materials were lacking in some way.  Maybe the speaker on the video was not engaging, wasn’t understood, or the content seemed very dated.  It could be that the video was great, but the homework in between was monotonous or unchallenging.  On the other hand it could be that the homework was overwhelming.  I’ve experienced both.  This is why I stand firm on intentional small group study selections, we need to not just grab an interesting title off the shelf, but walk through it ourselves or seek suggestions from others.  You just never know what you are going to get.

If none of the above seems to be the case, my next suggestion is to ask the group.  Maybe their needs have changed, or it’s time to reevaluate the goal for the group.  If your goal as leader was to strengthen the marriages of your group members, and you have done six studies on a row relating to relationship building… maybe it’s time to mix it up.  Move to a study that actually is willing to talk about the physical aspects of marriage.  Has your group moved from young married couples to married couples with children.  Then it may be time to switch from studies on marriage to studies on parenting.  Talk to the group members and see what they want to study next.  If you’ve been leading expository studies on the Old Testament, maybe it’s time to take a jump forward to the Gospels for a bit.    Or, it may be time to bring in fresh faces and invite some new women to your closed group.  You may also need to consider that your group is ready to split, and begin leading their own groups.  Finally, you need to prayerfully consider if the Lord is prompting you to take a break.  It could be that you are entering a season of life where you are called to be the student. 

When interest wanes, something in the dynamic of the group isn’t working.  Once you have explored all of the questions about the form and function of the group, there are only technical questions left.  Such as… has our groups availability changed and we need to set a new day/time, has this group just met it’s purpose and it is time to disband entirely. 

Social Media Series – #1 Pinterest

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By Gena McCown, Women’s Ministry Council Co-Founder

This past week, I attended five day summit on Blogging.  It was an amazing opportunity to garner knowledge from the experience of bloggers that make a living off their blogs.  I was excited to see how it would help me in developing better content and even a financial benefit from my own personal blog.  What I didn’t expect was to take away some great information that we could use in our Women’s Ministries!

As WM Leaders, there are a LOT of questions that we get asked.

  • When is our next event?
  • Could you recommend a devotion or bible study?
  • Do you know of any GOOD Women’s Conferences?

Those are just a few of the questions that we get asked very often, but there are a slew of more personal ones too.

Wouldn’t it be nice to put all of those answers in one single place, where women can find the answers without having to pin you down after Sunday service? (Kidding!)

For most church websites, we have a limited amount of information we can include.   Many Women’s Ministries are turning to social media to serve as a point of information.  Utilizing social media platforms in this way gives the Women’s Ministry team a great way to communicate with their members, store information for future use,  and can even be used for fun.

When you set up a Pinterest account, you organize your page with pin boards.  These are like little miniature filing cabinets that you can title based on content.   You can set up a board for “Church Announcements” where you link back to the church website.  A pin board for “Community News” would be a perfect landing place for news in your community that would interest your members.  Or, create a pin board for “Christian Businesses” in your area that you can link to their websites.

You can also use the pin boards for fun things like “Crafts”, “Recipes”, “Heath & Fitness”.   For spiritual growth, create pin boards for “Bible Studies” or “Devotions”.  You could even link to your WM Facebook Group’s Events invitations, creating a WM Calendar of Events.    Have you ever had someone ask you about the worship songs from Sunday or  recent WM Event? Create a pin board.  Want to keep tabs on different organizations or ministries that your WM supports or volunteers with?  Create a pin board for that too!   It’s a limitless platform, where you can create as many pin boards as you want!

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Pinterest Boards are also a fantastic resource for the MW leaders.  We can create pin boards to store information on event planning, future studies we’d like to offer, decorating ideas, menus, themed events, products, leadership training, articles, retreat locations, and so much more.

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What I love about Pinterest is that you don’t have to choose.  If you decided to set up a Pinterest account for the women in the church to participate in, you can also use it for your WM leader team by creating “secret” boards.  First, select the “Create a board” square at the top left of your pin boards.

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A box will pop up for you to put in the details for the pin board, which contains a slider option for “secret”.  Slide to yes.  Now you have secret board that only you & those you assign as collaborators (under the slider) can see.  There is a limit to the number of secret boards you can create, so you will need to use broader terms for categorizing your team ideas.  However, it allows your pin board to serve a dual purpose.

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If you decide to create a Pinterest Account for your Women’s Ministry, please share it on our Facebook Group!  We can follow each other’s accounts and share ideas and inspiration!

Here is great outline on Pinterest for personal use, which I think is helpful.  Keep in mind, since it is a group to represent your church… use the church logo not your own personal photo for it.  Be sure to include the church website and other WM social media accounts you have registered.  You can update as needed.  If you need to, set up a gmail email account for your WM that you can use to register for social media platforms (even if you are not using it for members to communicate through).  I recommend this, because as WM leaders may change over the years, you can hand off that account information to future leaders (or other team members) without compromising your own personal accounts.

Invite the women from your church to your Pinterest Account, follow others WM Groups or Churches, and Retailers and Organizations that interest you as  WM leaders.  If you find an individual person who is posting great WM information, you can follow just that particular pin board without following their entire account.

Leadership Should Not Be Lonely

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When you read through the scriptures, you will see that the leaders were hardly ever alone.  When Moses was called to lead, he had his brother by his side.  King David had people that he relied on for counsel.  Jesus had his disciples.  Paul had people who traveled with him, as well as leaders that he left behind in cities to lead the local church.  Paul wasn’t even alone in prison!  When the apostles would travel to share the gospel, they often set out in pairs or small numbers.  Plus, they always had each other lean back on, no matter where they were in the world. Advice was a letter away.  When it was time to tackle bigger subjects, they would meet together as a group to discuss the matters at hand.

It’s a common clichéd phrase in America to say that “it’s lonely at the top” or “leadership is lonely”.  As leaders we need to recognize that God never intended our leaders to be lonely.  In a previous article it was already mentioned the importance of having your own Timothy in place, someone you are developing as another leader or your eventual replacement.  However, this relationships are not meant to be superficial training grounds.  Those that we bring into our inner circle to develop as leaders will often help mold and shape our leadership too.  We learn just as much from their experiences as they do from our own.  Developing leaders will ask questions that we may have never considered on our own, or see things from a different perspective.

As much knowledge as I have about Women’s Ministry from experience coupled with books and research…

… I still don’t know everything. I have not encountered every possible scenario and even now I have some thoughts lingering in my head about how to handle certain circumstances should they arise.

Having a “Women’s Ministry Council” of leaders is part of how we can begin to fill those gaps in experience, knowledge, and wisdom.  Each leader is her own treasure trove of information to glean from.  Some WM Leaders are Pastor’s wives, who can give us insight to how Pastors view Women’s Ministry, or ministries in general.  They can give us an inside out view of the life of the Pastor in the church, the pressures he faces, and the parameters staff make decision within.

When we gather with other Women’s Ministry leaders, we have an opportunity to offer others our experience, and take in the experience of others.   As one leader just mentioned in our Facebook Group, we don’t need to reinvent a new wheel.  We just need help in finding the wheel that fits our group best.  We can pick and choose from the advice given and experiences shared, using those tidbits to shape our ministry’s future.  And, we can discard the things that don’t really apply to our needs.

We have a group of people whom we can share our successes with, and help them foster new ideas for their ministry.  And, we have a group of women who we can lean on for support when we are simply at a loss on how to grow our ministry.

Resources are more than books and websites, our best resources are the other leaders we are serving alongside with in our own communities.  Facebook groups and international websites have a lot to offer us in terms of general information.  However no one knows what it is like to serve THIS community, than those women who are in the trenches with you.

Every day, we gain more visitors to our website from other areas of the United States and beyond.  What we are doing here, in our South Florida location, is creating a program that we want to be duplicated in other regions.  By 2017, I am praying that all of our kinks have been worked out and that we will be able to put together a plan for Women’s Ministry Councils across the country.  Please keep our work in your prayers, that the Lord will guide this endeavor.  The blessing it has been for us, should not be contained to South Florida.

Women’s Ministry needs a leadership community!

Branding & Building Workshop

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If you were unable to attend our Women’s Ministry network and training event on Saturday, here is a little recap of the training you missed.  This information will be in two installments, beginning with BRANDING YOUR MINISTRY.    Look for future support articles and resources on this topic as well.

Branding Your Ministry:

  • Branding is how we create short visual and verbal explanation of who we are and what we do.
  • Branding helps us communicate information quickly and efficiently.
  • Branding will assist your team members in remaining focused on your ministry purpose.

Visual branding gives us an image or logo that is easily identifiable.  When scanning the church bulletin or website, your image will catch the attention of the women in your church to your upcoming events or announcements.

Combining visual branding and a few key words, will ensure that your guests will know who you are, where you are located, and what you are doing.  consider a simple business card.  If you only had that much space available, and you wanted it to be visually pleasing, what information would you make sure to include?

The selection of these few key words, which may be bullet points – a mission statement – or a piece of scripture, will create a litmus test for your team.  If every event or program is tested against the “brand”, you can decide which elements should be invested in and which should be passed on.

Common Mistakes in Branding:

  • Avoid continually rebranding the ministry.  Sometimes when a ministry takes on new leadership there is a strange need to rebrand the ministry.  It’s the new leaders way to indicate that change is on the horizon.  However, when we change the name of our minsitry we take a risk of losing those who identify the ministry to the old name. 
  • Avoid complex designs, trendy names, or unfamiliar acronyms.  If your ministry identity is not easily understood, women are going to pass right by it.  Complex designs will not always translate well into various types media, or can cost a fortune in printing costs.  Trendy names will eventually date themselves and require change to stay relevent.  Just because a term or acronym is familiar to seasoned Christians, it won’t be obvious to new guests or in the community.  We shouldn’t live under an assumption every one will “get it” because it seems obvious to us.    Who wants to go to your local HAGS meeting?  Even if it does mean Holy and Glorious Sisters…
  • Avoid using names that will date your ministry, or make it appear to focus on certain ages or stages of life.  Your ministry is going to speak for itself, if you think giving it a younger sounding name is going to bring in younger women… you will be disappointed.  Or worse, you may allienate your older women.

Successful Branding Strategies:

  • Use What You Have!  If your church has already invested in having a logo/branding package designed, see if you can have the words “Women’s Ministry” (or whatever your ministry name is) added to it.  It will cost you less than starting from scratch, and will be professionally done. You can even ask to feminize it with the simple change of a color or visual element.
  • Know Who You Are!  What is your ministry purpose or goal?  What is the vision of the church and how does the Women’s Ministry fit into that vision?  The answer to these questions can help you design your logo or come up with that catch phrase.
  • Keep It Simple!  Clean and simple designs with core information is best.  Easy to remember names and catch phrases will be helpful.  Ministry name, who the ministry serves, and where the ministry is located will be your most valuble information.  Have a Women’s Ministry page set up on your church website or start one on your own through a free site (like wordpress), or even a Facebook group.  Then your print materials can point women to these resources where they can get more detailed information about the church and your ministry.
  • Know Your Audience!  Where and how you are going to use your branding is important.  If your Women’s Ministry is purely focused on building up the women in your church, you don’t need as much of an explanation as you would for a ministry that is reaching out into the community.