Prayer & Worship, Training Event Recap

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The Women’s Ministry Council had another great training event on the value and importance of integrating Prayer and Worship into your Women’s Ministry Programs.

We would like to thank P&R Publishing for their donation of Susan Hunt’s Prayers of the Bible Study and Leader Guide, for each woman in attendance.  Additional thanks to The Good Book Company, who donated copies of 5 Things to Pray for Your Church.  Table Talk Magazine (from Lingonier Ministries) also donated copies of their back issue on Worship MattersMoody Publishing provided our women with sample chapters from two newly released studies I am Found and An Unexplainable LifeCrossway sent our women sample chapters from their book Praying Together .   Talk about a great group of resources for our leaders and their teams!

If your Women’s Ministry is looking to partner up with some ministries, for the first time at a council meeting we highlighted two ministries that are doing great things in the world!  The first is The Freedom Challenge, which works to free women and children from sex trafficking, sex slave industry.  If you have women in your ministry who love physical challenges and have a heart for these women, be sure to look into this great ministry.    However, if your women have a heart for children in impoverished nations… One Child Matters is a ministry  that opens up the doors to sponsor children, have missions trips to their development centers, and impacts the communities abroad as well as in our church.    Both of these ministries were featured in our July and August Ministry Spotlight articles.

Now for the meeting recap, in case you missed it….

Worship Matters

Our first speaker, Sheila Thompson, addressed the importance of including Worship as an intentional part of our Women’s Ministry events.  While worship can be defined in various ways, Sheila (who has a music background and credentials) talked specifically about the musical forms of worship.  Highlighting scriptures that reference of song and musical instruments as worship, Sheila was able to provide us with the biblical foundations of this style of worship.  However, Sheila dug deeper and covered the physical, mental, and health benefits of singing.  The Lord is so good to give us an act of worship that helps us in not only spiritual ways… but our bodies and minds.

Sheila shared how in the scriptures (and it is referenced over 63 times) that music is a posture of worship to the Lord, a weapon in battle, invites the power of the Lord into our lives as we praise, and that the Lord even sings over us (Zephaniah 3:17).  We discovered how many of our worship songs are rooted and sometimes directly quoted from the scriptures to provide us strength, encouragement, hope, and trust in the Lord … as well as, songs of praise and thanksgiving.

In our Women’s Ministry events, Sheila pointed out that by starting out our events with a few praise songs… we are setting the tone for the event.  Women are able to surrender and let go of all the junk they came in with.  They are preparing their hearts and minds to receive the word the Lord has for them.  They are in a better mood going out than they were coming in.  These songs stick with us as we move through the day, and we find ourselves returning to them.  Additionally, there are times where despite the troubles and the trials we are going through, we can choose to sing in victory!

Integrating worship into your Women’s Ministry program can start with simple steps… such as including Worship songs as part of your Women’s Brunch or even at the beginning of your small group sessions with a song or two.  One of our council women spoke up and shared how they conclude their meetings with a song, so the women leave on a note of praise & hope.  As a Women’s Ministry Leader, you can take this even a step further by planning Christian Concerts into your calendar by either attending local concert events OR by hosting a night of Worship at your own church.

Praying Matters

Our second speaker, Gena McCown, addressed the importance of having a posture of prayer and fostering a solid prayer life among the women in our churches.  Gena began by pointing out the relationship between singing and praying.  As we look to the Psalms and other areas of scriptures we see many prayers were lifted up by the body in the form of song.  There are numerous references in the scriptures about our call to prayer, why we pray, what we pray for, and how we are to pray. 

The call to pray is marked as something we are to do continuously, without ceasing.  Prayer is not an occasional thing we do when we need something from God, but a regular habit.  As ministry leaders we model this posture of prayer for the women in our churches, but we are also put into a position to teach people how to pray.  Some are gifted by the Holy Spirit with the gift of prayer, others need to be helped along the way.  Even the disciples asked Jesus, “How do we pray?”.

The scriptures tell us that men ought always to pray (Luke 18:1) with thanksgiving (Colossians 4:2), without fear or doubting (1 Timothy 2:8) and calling on Him in truth (Psalm 145:18).    We pray to seek Him, in our distress, to seek provision, for healing, in confession, seeking forgiveness, and in thanksgiving and praise.  It is part of our daily habit, without ceasing (Luke 6:12, Colossians 4:2, 1 Thessalonians 5:17).

How do we pray?  We can use the scriptures, such as The Lord’s Prayer or the Psalms.  We can allow the scriptures to inspire our personal prayers, use our own words voiced outloud or written down, and we pray even when we can’t find the words.  Romans 8:26 reminds us that through the Holy Spirit the Lord hears our groaning.  We are praying in our lengthy conversation with the Lord, or when we simply cry out “Oh, God!”.

As leaders we model prayer when we use it at the start, ending, or even in the midst of our events and small group studies.  We model it when we stop what we are doing to pray for someone on the spot vs. telling them we will pray for them later and adding it to our list.  We pray and share those prayers within notes of encouragements, a quick text that says the Lord put you on my heart today and I wanted you to know I was praying for you, and when we specifically ask people how we can pray for them. 

We foster prayer life among our women, when they hear our prayers.  When we start off our leadership meetings praying for the church leaders and our communities.  We set the example, but we also teach.  Include a small group on how to pray, or invite one of your prayer warrior women to lead a prayer ministry in your church.  Have a workshop series on different prayer methods and habits, invite a speaker for your next brunch that will guide your women to a posture of prayer.    As it becomes a more common practice in your Women’s Ministry leadership team, it will spread to the women in the church, and into our communities.

We must also be willing to share our testimony on prayers, so that women not only understand how we pray… but how the Lord responds to those prayers.  We share our answered prayers, praising God.  We share our unanswered prayers, trusting God.  We share the prayers that were not answered how we expected or hoped, acknowledging His ways being better than our own. 

Finally, it is important to create an environment of trust and authenticity among the women.  As we share our prayer requests, they begin to see that we as leaders have struggles to.  We have unanswered prayers, we seek His will and favor, we pray without ceasing for our prodigals to return… our husbands to find Jesus… our addictions to be healed… and our good news too!  In our vulnerability, they will find authenticity… and then our anonymous prayer requests will begin to disappear and a community of sisters walking in faith, praying for one another will begin to form.

Ministry Spotlight: One Child Matters

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This summer, at The Gospel Coalition Women’s Conference, I happened to come across a great ministry in the Exhibition Hall.  After spending quite a few minutes talking ministry with their representative Curtis Wilson, I fell head over for the work that One Child Matters is doing for children all over the world & the impact that they are having on communities.  What is beautiful about partnering up with a ministry like One Child Matters, is that there is a impact not only abroad but in our churches, communities, and in ourselves.

The very first time my family ever sponsored a child from another country, we specifically chose a child who was similar to age as our children.  It’s been beautiful to watch her grow up and turn into a young woman who is not only growing in her faith but dedicated to being a positive influence on her own community.  One of my most treasured possessions is a letter she wrote to us where she shared how she prays for us.  When I think of the difference in our lives and opportunities, to know that she is praying for us is a humbling reminder that we are all in this life together.  We are all family, brothers and sisters… sons and daughters… of the King.  Family cares for and prays for each other, regardless of the number of miles between us.

If your church or Women’s Ministry is looking for an organization to partner with… I am thrilled to recommend One Child Matters as a suggestion.  There are children available for sponsorship, as well as missions trip opportunities, and you can request a speaker from One Child Matters to speak at your church or next Women’s Ministry event. 

For more information, please visit their websiteOr, you can contact Curtis Wilson directly at 614.560.5742  and on Twitter @CurtisDWilson

If you are a local Women’s Ministry Leader or Pastor’s wife, in the Treasure Coast or South Florida, visit our facebook page.  Curtis Wilson will be traveling to our area to share One Child Matters with local churches, and there will be a special dinner event for Women’s Ministry Leaders/Pastor’s Wives. You can add your name & church name to our list & we will make sure you receive an invitation to the event.

A Heart of Worship

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We are excited this weekend to have a new speaker at one of events.  Sheila Thomas is going to be sharing with our local leaders about the importance of having worship as part of our Women’s Ministry events.

Do you put much thought, as a Women’s Ministry Leader about incorporating worship into your events?  Whether you are choosing a formal worship event, that is all about singing songs of praise and thanksgiving, or having a few minutes dedicated to opening an event in worship… here are a few quick thoughts to consider.

Events tend to be a place where we feel very comfortable inviting guests.  These guests may not be familiar with old hymnals, your church’s go-to song list, or even what is being played on local Christian stations.  Therefore:

  • Look for songs that are easy and do not have complex melodies that are hard to follow.
  • Select songs that use more common vocab words vs. “Christianese”, so that our guests understand what it is they are singing.
  • Print out the lyrics or have the lyrics displayed on a projection screen for those who are unfamiliar, never assume people have memorized the lyrics to a common song or can follow along.
  • Even though women do tend to naturally sing at a higher octave than men, consider the untrained voice may have difficulty with high notes and use them sparingly.
  • Consider the theme of your event, the emotion you want to evoke from the women, and select songs that fit the theme or desired response well.
  • Don’t be afraid to bring in a male worship leader for a women’s event.
  • If your church worship team is taxed for time already, consider using someone from the body who has this gift but can’t commit to the regular schedule of the worship team.  There may also be someone from your youth group that could lead worship.
  • Contact local Christian Colleges with music programs for potential worship leaders.   Many of these colleges require volunteer hours of their students, and leading worship may count.  This is a win for the student, to gain more hours.  It’s a win for the ministry too, as it helps offset budget concerns.  Make sure to ask the college if you are allowed to compensate the student for travel time/expenses or give a monetary thank you gift even though they are volunteering.
  • Consider balance in the planning stages regarding how much time you want to allot for worship songs, where in the course of the program do you want to utilize them (beginning, throughout, ending).

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Many thanks to Ligonier Ministries and their magazine “Table Talk“, for gifting the women in attendance this weekend a copy of their back issue Worship Matters“.  It is a great addition to our speakers thoughts on why we need to incorporate worship in to our programs.  It’s a valuable resource on a beautiful topic.

Small Group Series #4- When We Meet

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By Gena McCown. Co-Founder Women’s Ministry Council

We have plowed through some length portions for this series, and now that we have taken care of the behind the scenes topics… let’s move to the front side of things.  We can have all of the prep work in check and still fail at small groups because we can’t control the meeting itself.  Now, I am going to admit that no matter how much you try a meeting can get away from you.  None of us are perfect, but the point I am going to focus on is what you need to happen MOST of the time.  Then when there is an occasional slip up, you will be forgiven.

Let’s cover some basic points that we should ALL be doing, then we’ll move on to the things where we have some options.

  • Preview the Material – do not going into each meeting blind.  Either watch the video and go through the workbook earlier in the day (or week), or even consider going through the whole thing before the study begins.  You will have a clearer idea of how long the material is going to take to cover, if you think you are going to need more time for discussion.
  • If you are teaching expository studies yourself, you should be preparing throughout the week, not a last minute hurrah before study starts.
  • Your group should be bathed in prayer, as anything we do that draws people closer to God the enemy is going to work to stop.  I always pray for obstacles to be removed from the path of the women to the study each week.
  • Set a realistic expectation on how long the study should last, and stick to that timeframe.  Occasionally conversation may take you over that timeframe, but make that the exception not the rule.
  • If a study is 8 weeks long, I always recommend telling people to plan for 9-10 weeks.  Inevitably something will happen that will disrupt the schedule. If everything goes according to plan use that last meeting as a conversation night to recap the study, make up date for anyone who missed a segment from the video, service project night, or even a fellowship night out on the town.
  • If you are meeting at a local coffee shop either schedule extra time into your meeting for ordering food/coffee…. or remind your attendees to arrive early to place their orders.
  • If you are meeting at the church or host home, make arrangements for any snacks/refreshments for the evening.  You do not always need to provide refreshments, but if you do put together a volunteer sign up sheet for the first meeting.

RUNNING THE MEETING:

  • Start on Time – be sure to show up a few minutes early to set up your videos or other things needed for that nights study.  You should be ready to go on time, and arriving early gives you time to deal with any technical issues.
  • Open in Prayer – you can choose to do a general opening prayer, allow people to make prayer requests, or take turns praying.  It is not uncommon for prayer time in small groups to take a long time if we are not careful.  I have tried a few methods each working effectively for different groups.  1) Ask the women to think of their prayer requests while praying a general prayer, asking God to listen to the prayers on their hearts.  2) Ask the women to submit their prayer requests to you via email/text prior to the meeting, then you can not only list them in brevity as you pray but also provide a printed list for the members to take home & pray over during the week.  3) Allow each woman to verbally make her prayer request before or during the prayer, but set a limit for 1 min. per person.  Establish this at the start of the 1st meeting, and remind the women they are free to ask questions or give additional prayers and support when the meeting is over.
  • Establish the “House Rules” at the first meeting, which will include start and finish times, how prayer requests are being handled, reminding the women that what is said in small group stays in small group, etc.  Then in the 2nd meeting give a quick recap.  No need to repeat at every study night.  Revisit if new members join the group.
  • Watch the Video/Teach the Lesson – if you are watching a video, you know exactly how much time it will take (it is usually printed in the jacket sleeve of the DVD).  If you are teaching the materials, watch the clock to ensure you leave time for discussion.
  • Prompt the discussions, being mindful to not take over the time talking yourself (which can happen with teachers, ha!) or that others in the group do not monopolize the discussion time.  Ask specific people questions, make eye contact to feel out if someone has something to offer, and help guide the conversation along.
  • Close in Prayer – In the closing prayer I like to include asking for protection over our church, the women in attendance, and those who didn’t make it for that evening.

In between study group meetings, I like to send email reminders if there is something the women need to do before we meet up again.  You can also use this email to remind the snack volunteers, do the assigned “homework”, any immediate prayer requests that can’t wait until the next group meeting, church announcements that might be important, etc.

So what makes the small group “effective”, since that sounds like any old meeting?  Being intentional.  I’ve been to many a meeting in the corporate world, spending 30+ minutes discussing something that could have been said in an email.  I’ve sat in small groups where so much time was spent talk about our prayers, that by the time we got to actually say them… we used up half of our meeting time.  I’ve led meetings where technical delays caused us to run behind, and I learned the hard way that I needed to arrive extra early.

What makes them effective is that everything goes so smoothly there is nothing to complain about, nothing to improve, and our goals are met.  It’s effective because it wasn’t defective.

When your small group meetings go awry, and are not effective it will be quite evident.  Word will get back to you that group thinks you are disorganized or always behind.  You will see your number of attendees drops, your regulars stop coming, or that you no longer get anyone signing up for your group.  You will see that more time is spent praying and talking than studying and you can’t finish in your allotted number of weeks.  You will run out of time, members, interest, and find yourself questioning “why do I even bother”.

If you are meeting your goals, if your group members stay put, if your group is growing in number, if your group is growing in their walk…. then you are running an effective meeting.

The final installment in this series will address some great questions that were emailed in about this topic, and will be posted on July 5th.  If you have a question and did not submit it yet, pop over to our series intro and submit your question now!

Social Media Series- #3 Instagram

insta3.pngBy Gena McCown, Women’s Ministry Council Co-Founder

Instagram is a pretty popular form of Social Media, you would be hard pressed to find someone who has never heard of it.  They may not use it, but they know about it.  However, you may not have realized the beauty of Instagram as a resource for your Women’s Ministry.

Just like Twitter, when you set up your Instagram account you can choose to set it as Public or Private.  Public is a great way to get the word out about your ministry, but Private is going to protect your content from unwelcomed eyes.  When you set up your account, make sure to include in the profile description important information such as the name of the church, website, and city you are located in.  As well, there are options in the account settings that will allow you to link your Instagram account with your Facebook Group, Twitter Account, and other social media platforms.  This means you can post to Instagram and automatically it will show up in your other social media platforms.  That my friend is a time saving win.

One of the aspects I love about Instagram is the photo heavy sharing, which is a benefit to Women’s Ministry events where everyone is taking pictures.  The women can post their pictures on their own Instagram account and then tag (or hashtag, we’ll get to that next) the ministry or event.  This allows us to share our experiences, photos, opinions, and even live quotes from events.  Unlike Twitter, Instagram doesn’t have a character limit… you can post as much as you want.  Or, you can even post video clips you take at the event.

What is a “hashtag” it is the combination of the pound symbol ( # ) and a word/phrase/title.  They are used to categorize your Instagram photos, and can be used to search for related content.  For example, if you were looking for ideas for a women’s beach retreat you could search ” #beachretreat ” and Instagram would provide you with a slew of photos taken by people related to that term.  People are now beginning to use hashtags in very intentional ways, like hashtags for their children… businesses… and events.

A very common Instagram hashtag use is for weddings, where all the guests are given a “hashtag” to use for their wedding photos.  If you want to see photos, just click the hashtag and you’ll see all the photos associated with it… whether you took the photos or not.  This is also a common practice for Women’s Conferences too.  You’ll notice if you have attended Living Proof Live with Beth Moore, she has a hashtag for that event. It’s a quick way to find information associated with her events.

Some hashtag concepts for Women’s Ministries ….

#YourWomensMinistryName — if you have a unique name for your ministry, simply hashtagging the name might be enough.     IE:  HolyRollersForHim

#ChurchWomensMinistry — if your name isn’t super unique, couple it with the church name and/or city to help distinguish it from ministries of similar names.    IE:FBCPSLWomesMinistry or #ChristCommunityStuartWM

#TC3WMRetreat2016 — if you are having a special retreat, you can use a common hashtag combining the church name, women’s ministry reference, what the event is, and the year.  If this is something you do from year to year, then in future years you only need to change out the year to update it.

#SheIsHis2016 — If you have a theme to your event, you can couple that theme with the year.  However, this is only going to work well if you are the only ones who have used such an event name and theme.  If it’s not a unique name, tuck in the name of your church or city to help differentiate.

So, all that out of the way… what are some ways you can use an Instagram to benefit the Women’s Ministry at your church?

An important thing to note about Instagram is that it is primarily designed for use with smartphones and tablets, not table top PCs and laptops.  You can VIEW and even COMMENT on Instagram posts via your PC and laptop.  However any new photos or content you want to post to your Instagram account must be done via your phone or tablet.  If you are like me, and HATE typing out lengthy messages on my tiny phone screen or even tablet screen… there is a work around.  Use your phone/table to make the initial post.  Then from your PC or laptop, you can comment on your own post and type away.

* Scripture Sharing – you can post a scripture of the day (or week) for memorization.

* Devotions – type out a devotion coupled with a picture, or make a short video devotion.

* Service Recaps – share video from the last Sermon or a clip of a worship song to help the women in reflecting on the message throughout the week.

* Live Event Posting – if you are at an event like a conference or your own women’s retreat, just like you can live tweet… you can live Instagram.  Share photos with quotes from speakers, or of the women fellowshipping.  It’s a fantastic way to include the women who couldn’t come, and as I suggested in the Twitter post… it also may help you get the women in your church who have a hard time committing to see what they missed out on.  This could improve your attendence at future events.

* Dedicated Days – Utilize specific days of the week for specific tasks.  Meditative Mondays, might be the day you post scriptures to memorize or meditate on.  Worship Wedensdays, that could be the day you share your clips from the worship during past services.  Word-Filled Wednesdays, would make a great day were you walk the women through a weekly bible reading plan.  Fellowship Fridays, can be how you keep track of your weekly Friday Fellowship (small group, bible study, women’s minsitry meetings).   Not evey dedicated day needs a catchy name.  Mondays could be dedicated for scriptures, Tuesdays for prayer requests, Wednesdays for community needs, etc.

* Announcements & Information – Instagram is a great resource for making quick announcements about the happenings in the church and upcoming Women’s Ministry events.  You can even include direct links to places to register/pay for larger events.

* Last Minute Updates – Just like Twitter, most people access Instagram from their phones.  This makes it a great place to announce last minute changes or details.

* Bible Study and Small Groups – Not only can you use Instagram to share about the bible studies and small groups you are offering, you can post video clips promoting the material.  Additionally, if your participants need to purchase their study book online… you can put a direct link in the post.  Easy, peasy.  You can even tag the group leader with their Instagram account so that interested women can contact her directly through the Direct Message feature.

Finally, as another quick suggestion… for your WM Leader Team…

You can now have more than 1 instagram account.  Consider setting one up for just the leader team.  Make it private, and use this a quick communication source.   As the leader you can post quick pictures of things you are considering buying, locations for potential retreats, possible study materials for the next season of Bible Studies, etc.  Then your team has a place they can respond quickly.  (Granted, I would recommend giving them a heads up if you are going to be out and want immediate replies – so they know to be watching).  I think it could be a great way to share information with your team members, in real time, with the ability for everyone to contribute the conversation.   Such uses might include if you are out scouting retreat locations, at a conference and looking through small group study options, etc.

And… a private leader Instagram account might be a great avenue for team building and bonding amongst the leaders.

Be a Presence in Your Community

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Years ago, my Pastor made a point to our congregation on what kind of impact he wanted our church to make on our community.  He said that if our doors had to shut today, he would want our community to miss us tomorrow.  There are churches and ministries that open and close all of the time, but how often does their absence go noticed?  Does the community even notice they are gone?

Just last year, a friend and her family began to faithfully respond to the call toward International Missions.  They gathered a group of local friends together to organize a fundraising event.  A location was picked, local businesses rented booth space or sponsored the food and games areas.  They reached out to the local churches and asked if their worship band would be willing to donate time, playing just a set of music during the day.  In exchange the church could set up a tent and hand out information about their church to people from the community who passed through.  What an amazing opportunity to 1) support missions work, 2) network with other churches, and 3) introduce themselves to the people in the community who may not have a church home.

ONE church responded.  One out of HUNDREDS.  I was shocked.  You’ll be happy to know The Women’s Ministry Council was there.

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So, let me turn the question on to your ministry… how does your ministry present itself to the community?  Are you interested in serving your church only?  Or would you be willing to step out into the community and support another ministry, that is not your own?  What holds you back?

When a local church hosts a simulcast event for a well known speaker, why are we not carpooling our women to these events?  Or, at minimum, promoting it to our women?  Are we afraid to lose our women to another church?  Is our calendar too full, not providing enough room for divine appointments to come along our way?  When the community needs us, are we too busy to step out and say…  “Here we are, how can we help?”

Women’s Ministry is an amazing opportunity to not only serve the women in our own churches, but other churches and the community at large.  Big churches can come along side small churches, welcoming them into our Women’s Ministry events.  We can make space for the churches who lack the space.  Churches that have been blessed with resources, like Women’s Bible Studies, can share resources with those who lack.  Small ministries can band together, serving long side each other and sharing the load.  All of us, ministries of any size, can work together in serving our community.

What if?

  • What if all of our women’s ministries grouped up for a Habitat For Humanity building project?
  • What if all of our women’s ministries alternated weeks, providing meals to Molly’s House in Stuart?
  • What if all of our ministries came together to make blessing bags for the homeless?
  • What if all of our ministries fellowshipped together at local park, praying for our county?

What… if….

13 Signs People Are Excited to Attend Your Women’s Ministry

I was inspired to make this list based of the article 13 Signs People Are Excited to Attend Your Church.

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1. Women Bring Their Friends—The ultimate measurement of whether your people are excited to attend your Women’s Ministry events or not is whether or not they bring their friends.

2. The Driving Team—Are the women carpooling to the event?  This is evidence of connection and fellowship beyond the walls of the church.

3. The Line Formed to Enter the Building—If women arrive early, you know they are excited about the Women’s Ministry event.  Women arrive early to make sure they get a good seat.

4. The Greeters—Women who are not even on the team energetic and thrilled to be there, introducing themselves to new faces and helping get stuff done.

5. The Pre-Event Vibe—If you want to know if God is moving at any ministry, just describe for me the atmosphere in your building the 15 minutes before an event begins.  Is there energy in the room? What are the discussions about? Are people smiling and laughing? Is community being built?  And, even more so… was there anticipation leading up to the day of the event?

6. The Speakers Begin — Do the women immediate begin to quiet down and settle when the see the familiar faces of the women doing the introductions, speaking, or music?

7. The Response to the Music—If you are having worship music, are the women engaged or on their phones killing time?  Women who are excited to be there are only looking at their phones if they are looking for lyric prompts.

8. The Response to Scripture—Jesus is celebrated through the reading of His Word. There is spontaneous clapping or other affirmations while reading scripture.

9. The Response to the Message—Do you hear the women talking about the topic, presentation, or speaker after the event… even for days after the event?  Does it come up on Sunday?  And does the Pastor tell you that he’s heard good things?

10. Life Change—Are you seeing more women sign up for small groups, new faces on Sunday morning, and a deeper interest in building stronger relationship with Christ?  Are new habits being made that show an increased spiritual walk… like prayer, scripture study, etc.

 11. Women Walking to the Car—Women who had a great experience at your event…. will be slow in leaving the building, may even be found chatting in the parking lot after you lock the doors.  A great sign of community, fellowship, and communication!

12. Women Wanting More — Not every church has women’s events every week, or even every month.  If you have women who are asking for more, who want to know when the next event is… you are doing something right!  Keep doing it, and consider doing it more often.

13. And Most Important, It’s All About Jesus—Nothing creates excitement and expectation like continually focusing everything on the One who is worthy of all this excitement, Jesus.