July Leadership Calendar

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We have our quarterly live Women’s Ministry Council training event on the last day of June, it is all about serving our single sisters.  Therefore, we wanted to get the July Leadership Calendar up ahead of time.  You may notice we’ve adjusted the formatting a bit.  Hopefully this will eliminate future technical issues like we had in June.  Let us know what you think of the new format, and our entries for each day. 

You might also notice July 29-31 are missing.  Don’t worry!  We didn’t forget these 3 important days of the month.  The August 2018 calendar will be posted at the end of July and will include the 29-31 and all of August.  

Have a great weekend, and watch for the recap of Saturday’s training event to be posted on Monday and Wednesday of next week.

SOCIAL MEDIA DRAWING WINNERS:

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10 Quick Questions

Survey SaysWMC Friends,

It’s that time again, for a quick survey of just 10 questions to get to know our readers better.

As we get a better grasp of how your ministry functions, we can create content that fits within that function.

It is anonymous.  Please share with other ministry leaders in your circle.

 

CLICK HERE TO TAKE SURVEY!

If you would like to send us any additional PRIVATE comments about how we can better serve your ministry,  please use the form below.   These comments will NOT be published or visible on our website.  If you would like to include your name, email should we have any questions related to your comments that is an option but is not required in order to send your comment/suggestion/question.

Misconnected

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By Gena McCown

In a day and time where we are more connected than other digitally, our communities are responding with an increasing level of feeling alone.  When we look to the scriptures we see that community was a vital aspect of the local church.  Not only did they worship together, but they cared about one another on a personal level.  They tended to one another and carried each other’s burdens.  Communities worked together for the common good and because they were connected they were aware of what was happening in the lives those they called neighbor.

This led me to come to the very recent conclusion that we are not disconnected, we are just misconnected.  Experts have suggested that the problem with social media connections is that when one feels alone in their real life, they may turn to social media to connect and feel that void, and when that feeling of isolation doesn’t go away they dig deeper into social media to create more connections.  They are still seeking and looking for their tribe.  On the other hand, these experts have also suggested that once we are connected virtually the fear of missing out on what is being posted/shared may chain us to our devices verses going out and living life among others.

Disconnected seems so firm and final, like someone who has gone off grid or cut themselves off from society.  Disconnection happens when effort has left the equation of human relationship.  We have either made the decision to disconnect with another, or we have accepted their decision to connect with us.  I can’t believe a person who continually is seeking their tribe on social media outlets is seeking or accepting disconnection.  Instead they are trying to connect but in a different way, for whatever reason, and thus they are misconnected.  They are making connections but not the ones they need, which leaves the void they can’t fill.

What Can Women’s Ministry Do To Connect the Misconnected?

  • Connect the Women to Jesus – helping our women to understand who Jesus creates a foundation of self value and worth.  We connect them to Jesus through the Word which opens their eyes to a God who knows, hears, sees, and loves them… but who is also always with them.  We are never alone, when we are in God.
  • Connect the Women to Women in the Church – connecting women to other women who are also believers builds the foundations of community.  We have identified something we share in common, our faith, and embrace our connection as sisters in Christ.  As they begin to realize that they are not only walking this life with Jesus on their side but also a family of believers, the isolation will begin to dissipate.
  • Connect the Women to Community – through connecting the women to our community we begin to introduce purpose into their lives.  The more we connect with Jesus and our family of believers, the deeper our desire is to reach into our communities and serve others.  By connecting into our community we extend our community beyond what we could ever imagine.

How Do We Connect Women to Jesus: Bible studies, small groups, conferences, guest speakers, Sunday services, women’s brunches, retreats, workshops, etc.  It comes as we connect them directly to His Word via study, or as we share our testimonies via events.  

How Do We Connect Women to Women in the Church:  Ladies night/day out, women’s trips, retreats, brunches, fellowship events, concerts, movies, lunch dates.  Whether we start building connections through high attendance events or small intimate coffee dates, we are putting the building blocks in place for relationship.

How Do We Connect Women to Community:  Service projects within the church, local community, volunteering with local organizations and non-profits, local and international missions projects, etc. are all great ways to bring the women out of the church and into the community to serve.  By serving others, we often get to know them on a deeper level because we are meeting them where they are at.

Hospitality to Pastors & their Families

Naima

If you have been a member of a church for any length of time, you will have experienced the welcoming of a new Pastor or staff member to your church.   A Pastor search is such a process that for many of us we are as relieved as we are excited about welcoming this new person or family into our body of believers.  For the incoming Pastor and family, this could have been a long road too, waiting for God to guide their steps to your door.  Excitement and anxiousness combined, they are walking into a family of believers that they barely know.

My sister in Christ, co-laborer in the faith, Naima Johnston-Bush and her husband answered such a call.  They packed up their house in Florida and set off for Leesville First Assembly of God, in Kingdom service.  To my joy, on a Monday morning, I woke up to this picture and her words:

Naima

Our first Sunday at our new church and the ladies Ministry gave me an old fashioned “pounding”. They pounded me with God’s love and blessed our home with lots of great cleaning supplies, canned goods and boxed items. I won’t need cleaning supplies for the next six months.   ~Naima Johnston-Bush

First, I just want to shout out to the Women’s Ministry at Leesville for welcoming a family so beautifully.  Thank you for the love you showered on my friend.

Second, when I saw this picture… knowing we were heading into the topic of hospitality… I immediately asked permission to share.  THIS is such a wonderful way to display hospitality to new Pastors, Staff Members, and their families.

In all of my years in the church, I’ve seen plenty of people showered with gifts as they were leaving.  Moves, retirements, volunteers called into fulltime ministry or missions elsewhere, etc. have been opportunities to thank people for dedicated service to our church body and an encouragement and provision for those stepping out in faith.

I am not sure I’ve ever seen this kind of outpouring on someone who was coming into the body.  It may be possible things like this were done quietly among the existing staff members, gift cards and helping unpack.  In this occasion, it was the Women’s Ministry who stepped up and said how can we bless this new home?

It brought me to question how do we as Women’s Ministries let the women who are leading in our churches know that we appreciate them?  But also, ask myself, are we doing a good job welcoming in the wives and children that packed up everything and walked away from their friends and family in order to follow their husband’s call in to ministry?

For the last several years, I have participated in a group of Pastor’s wives (even though I am not one) in order to have a better understanding of how ministry affects the wives and family of Pastors.  I’m so thankful that the group welcomed me in, even though I’m not a PW… because it has been eye opening.

When I hear their stories, the good… bad… and the ugly… I just know that we could be doing a better job.

So, whether you want to share here … or talk among your Women’s Ministry teams, let’s ask and discuss the following questions:

  1.  Are we showing hospitality to our Pastor and Staff wives?
  2. How do we welcome in a new Pastor and his family?  What could we do, if we are not currently doing anything?
  3. What does hospitality for these women look like long term, once they are settled or have been in the fold for years?

Good hospitality makes a person not only feel welcomed through the doors, but that we are wanted to stay for the long term.  It shows a person they are seen, loved, and makes them feel cared for.  We minister to their spirit, their hearts, their minds, and even their households when we love well.

Hospitality Starts with a Warm Welcome

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When we think of the word “hospitality” we think of the way in which we serve people.  There is an entire industry related to hospitality, from hotels and event planners to meals, transportation, and entertainment.  It is a service we provide to others that allows them to enjoy the space.

So where does hospitality begin on in our ministries?  It happens long before the events and studies that make up our ministry calendar.

It begins with a warm welcome.

Women who are visiting your church for the first time, either for a Sunday Service or Women’s Ministry event, need to feel welcome in the space from the moment they arrive.  What can we do as ministry leaders to ensure our guests feel welcome?

An Easy to Navigate Space:  Your visitor needs easy access to parking, clear signage on where to enter the building for the service/event, and signs or people to guide them once in side.  Several years ago, I attended an event at a local church.  This church had multiple buildings and parking lots.  There was not a single sign that indicated which parking lot entrance to use, or which building the event was being held in.  During the lunch break, there was an announcement on where the lunch was being served without any direction at all.  There was almost an assumption that everyone at the event either attended the church or was a guest of someone attending, and could find their own way.  They forgot that this event was also publicized on the radio and on the website for the larger ministry hosting events nationwide.  

Never assume your church or even location is easy to navigate, just because it makes sense to you.  Always assume that your guests will need signs or people to help them find their way to the main spaces, bathrooms, event spaces, child care, etc.

Easy Access to Information:  Some guests are very eager to meet people, and not afraid to ask a million questions.  Your more introverted guests will be more timid.  By ensuring that the basic information on the women’s ministry is listed in the New Guest packet, you are extending an invitation to women to find out more.  If you have an information desk or wall, where ministries can post more detailed information, having a sign or invitation cards for your next event will make sure guests know they are welcome to your events.  This also includes having information about your women’s ministry on your church website.

At minimum, guests should be able to have access to the contact information for the women’s ministry, current Bible Studies or Small Groups, and information on your upcoming event(s).  Also consider having  an occasionally informal breakfast to get to know new women in the church.  This doesn’t need to be a potluck brunch, but could be at a local restaurant where everyone pays for their own meal.  

When we make sure to let women know they are welcome at our next event, they know that we are not a closed clique of women but rather a group with arms opened wide.

Help Her Meet People:   Guests, particularly returning guests, will want to get to know more women in the church.  Too often, it’s easy to fall back on the “stand up and introduce yourself to the group” activity.  However this can be overwhelming for the introvert, and frankly even with the best of effort… it’s hard to remember all these new names and facts.  Instead, use the women’s ministry team to divide and conquer introducing new women ot the rest of the body.  If each women’s ministry team member takes time to get to know these new guests individually, they can then make very intentional introductions to members in the body who share similar interests, have children of the same ages, etc.

This far more intentional introductions will actually help foster relationships and is a warmer welcome than throwing the woman into the spotlight before a large group.   

Hospitality Never Ends:  Being hospital as guests walk through your doors for the first time is just the beginning.  Hospitality is something that continues on as part of our ministry work.  We are hospitable when we open our homes to small groups and playdates, when we answer calls and take time to get to know people better, and into our events as we make sure that everyone feels wanted and welcome.  When hospitality drops off, it can make our guests feel as if our initial welcoming was superficial or short lived.  Hospitality is a long term culture that needs to be cultivated and fostered.

Look for your women who have the gift of Hospitality, and bring them into your women’s ministry team to lay the foundation.  If you are a large church, you may wish to create a welcoming committee.  Otherwise, these women will be valuable additions to your team as they advise you about how to make sure your women’s ministry program and events are warm and welcoming to all who walk through the doors.

Rest & Retreat: A reflection & call to rest.

Rest & Retreat(1)

I stepped down from a ministry I had started and led in my church for over 6 years.  It was a privilege to lead in that capacity. However,  I realized that the ministry consumed much of my life.   When I stopped leading I didn’t anticipate how big of a gap I would find in my life now that I wasn’t making phone calls, networking, leading,  planning, and mentoring; all while being a wife, mother, and part time employee.  I hadn’t realized how much work it took to run this ministry. I just did it because it needed to be done.

This made me think about other things.  In the 6 years of leading this ministry I lost both of my parents, graduated from college, and started a speaking ministry.

I had chosen to step down from this ministry in order to pursue another calling, but I felt like the Lord wasn’t calling me into another ministry right away; but back to my first and most important ministry,  my husband, children and family.  I also felt He has been calling me into a time of healing from grief.  Grief is tough.  It has been 6 years since my father passed, 3 years since mom passed, and only 3 weeks since my step-father has passed.  In this time, I have asked God to give me rest and help me deal with the stuff that needs healing; grief being one of them.

I have been busy getting to know my husband again, and my children.  My oldest is a freshmen in high school who plays sports and has a more active social life than I do. I now ask myself how did I ever have time to lead a ministry because I seem to have no life right now. But, I am thankful because it is an amazing journey.

I am learning that as a leader you must take time away to rest.  A good leader knows that rest is important.  While I would like to say I am great at this,  I don’t always take the needed time.  I am learning to see that when God closes one door, He maybe telling me to rest for a moment because resting is good for me until He  is ready to open the next door.

Matthew 11:28-30

Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.  Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am gentle and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls.  For my yoke is easy and my burden is light.

I am still doing mission work, speaking, and mentoring but not so much that I forget to rest and heal.  I am also praying through this next season of life that I am feeling called to.

I am thankful that the Lord stresses the importance to take time to rest in Him. In all of this healing and resting the Lord has and always will be faithful.  He is my complete rest.  The verse I leave you with is this:

Psalm 37:7a
Rest in the LORD and wait patiently for Him…

Characteristics of Godly Leaders: Not a Lover of Money

The LoveofMoney

There are so many reasons why Paul would write to Timothy that those in the office of overseer should not be a lover of money (1 Timothy 3:3).

Some immediate thoughts that come to mind:

  • If you value money too much, you may put your day job or your desire for success above your ministry responsibilities.  
  • You may be tempted to use your position for financial gain.
  • Often the love of money accompanies pride.

In fact, later in 1 Timothy, chapter 6, Paul goes on to say:  “For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil” (v10).  Warning that those who desire to be rich fall into temptation, ensnared by foolish and harmful desires, plunge into ruin and destruction.  He even says that the desire for money, the craving of it, has caused some to walk away from their faith.

However, I think there is another aspect of money we should consider, in regard to ministry.  Let’s face it, the majority of those who are serving in a ministry capacity are not doing so without some financial struggle in their own life.  This struggle also happens in the ministry field.  Who hasn’t dreamt of what a little extra money could mean to the ministry work that we do.  What if we had an extra $500 or more in the budget.  Oh the things we could do!

Therein lies the culprit… “with money” this is what “I” can do.   While it is true that money is a means to get things done, such as purchasing supplies or bringing in guest speakers; money is also a tool of man.  God doesn’t require money to do anything.   We can throw a lot of money at our ministry, polishing the rough edges, making it attractive to others, filling the seats at our tables to the brim.  But this is not the measure of success.

Spiritual growth is a measure of success.  Bringing women to Christ is a measure of success.  We create a ministry that serves in His name, we bring women to the Cross, and then watch as the Lord does a work in their life.  He creates something new, He molds and shapes, and none of that costs a single dollar.

A shoe string budget it not a bad thing, it actually requires us to lean on God and trust in His provision for our ministry.  It teaches us to be good stewards with the blessing we are given.  It also challenges us to be creative with the gifts, talents, and blessings the Lord has given each of us to be used in the ministry as we serve others.

How much does it cost to welcome others into your home?

Do we need a huge budget to pray with another women?

What is the expense to sit and walk through the scriptures with a new believer?

When we begin to believe that money will solve all of our ministry problems, open up more opportunities, or even that money will give us a better pathway to bring people to Christ… we begin to blur the lines and our love for money grows because we become dependent on it.

This doesn’t mean that God won’t bless us financially, as a ministry.  It’s a warning to not become dependent on it, to not allow it to become something that we crave.  We may receive it, but remember we are being given something that is already God’s and called to use it in a way that honors Him.

A godly leader will recognize who the blessing is from, and what it is for.  They will not compromise their faith, their family, their home, their values, their time, and their service in order to gain more money.